Dynamically nesting local components with pages in Sitecore

Dynamically nesting local components with pages in Sitecore

The challenge

Information architecture and system design decisions can have a major impact on the ease with which content can be created and managed in Sitecore. Authoring experience is not always front-of-mind as architects and developers are shaping a system, but this can prove short-sighted as content teams begin to build content in the system.

During recent authoring experience audits of clients’ Sitecore platforms, I have noticed one key thing negatively impacting author efficiency. Many times, local components are not grouped with their parent page. While this is common and expected for globally shared components, it’s not recommended for unique instances of components referenced only by a single page. In one such case, there was a total separation of pages and components. There was an entirely separate directory for components that mirrored the page hierarchy manually. The rationale was that it kept page objects in the tree simple and uncluttered (which was true) but the end result was that authors were pre-creating all necessary components for a page ahead of time rather that authoring a page inline in Experience Editor. Rather than simply choosing from a list of allowable components and dropping an instance on a page, the first thing the content authors were required to do was establish a link to an existing data source. This really threw a wrench in the inline editing experience and was affecting content authors impressions of Sitecore – thinking “that’s just how it works.”

The solution

To allow for greater automation and improve author efficiency, dynamically nest components locally under each page object so that pages can be more quickly constructed and fully edited inline.


Through use of branch templates and standard values, a local Components folder can house all unique instances of components applied to a page. The content author doesn’t have to spend a lot of time thinking about where they should go. It reduces the number of decisions they have to make and speeds the authoring process. If you want to get fancy, you can even include sub-folders to keep multiple instances of different kinds of components organized (e.g. multiple rich text blocks, images, or videos).

This approach also simplifies the publishing process when you want to publish all components along with a page. Since these are sub-items, this relationship is easier to deal with rather than referencing components as related items.

This is something I have had a lot of success with and as the trend towards greater componentization in WCM systems continues it’s becoming a standard approach in the platforms Velir builds.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s